Great Comfort book sculpture by Malena Valcarcel

Great Comfort book sculpture by Malena Valcarcel

(Source: bookporn, via literatureismyutopia)

Joe Dempsie’s ALS Ice Bucket Challenge (x)

(Source: rubyredwisp, via maisiewilliams)

yamino:

Another favorite architect of mine is Antoni Gaudí.  I think his art just speaks for itself, don’t you?

(via electricalice)

Luke Cage was created in 1972.

Four years earlier, in 1968, Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot and killed.

Five years before that, in 1963, Medgar Evers was shot and killed.

Eight years before that, in 1955, a young Black man named Emmett Till was tortured, then shot and killed.

These events, and numerous others with frightening similarity, happened in a line, and in the early years of the first decade to reap the social benefits of the Civil Rights Movement, Marvel Comics gives the fans (and the world) a Black male superhero whose primary superhuman aspect… is that he’s bulletproof.

Not flight, or super speed, or a power ring.

The superhuman ability of being impervious to bullets.

Superheroes. Action heroes. Fantasy heroes.

Power fantasies.

Is there any doubt the power fantasy of the Black man in the years following multiple assassinations of his leaders and children by way of the gun would be superhuman resistance to bullets?

In American society, the Black man has come a long way from the terrors of the past handful of centuries, only to crash right into the terrors of the 21st century. Some of those terrors being the same exact ones their grandparents had to face and survive — or not.

There are Black men who are wealthy, powerful, formidable and/or dangerous. They can affect change undreamt of by their parents, and their parents’ parents. Their children will be able to change the world in ways we can intuit and others we can barely begin to try and predict.

But a bullet can rip through their flesh and their future with no effort whatsoever.

And so we look at Luke Cage, a man who gets shot on a regular basis, whose body language is such that he is expecting to be shot at, prepared for the impact — because he knows he can take it.

And maybe, in the subconscious of the uni-mind of Marvel Comics, is the understanding that Luke Cage may unfortunately always be a relevant fantasy idea for the Black man.

2012 – Trayvon Martin is shot and killed.

2013 – Jonathan Ferrell is shot and killed.

2014 – Michael Brown is shot and killed.

2015/2016 – Luke Cage premieres on Netflix.

I look forward to seeing if the Luke Cage of that show will have a true understanding of his power and what he symbolizes.


Real Life Proves Why Luke Cage Endures (via comicberks)

Reading that was like getting kicked in the gut. And yet it feels like that’s not enough.

(via optimysticals)

(Source: fyeahlilbit3point0, via americachavez)

queenrhaenyra:

→ Au : Got Race!bending: Asian Fancast :

Daniel Wu as Jon Snow, Michelle Yeoh as Catelyn Stark, Zhou Xun as Daenerys Targaryen, Suzuka Ogo as Arya Stark, Andy Lau as Stannis Baratheon, Liu Yifei as Sansa stark, Chow Yun Fat as Tywin Lannister, Gong Li as Cersei Lannister, Chang Chen as Jaime Lannister, Zhang Ziyi as Margaery Tyrell, Huang Xiaoming as Robb Stark, Ken Watanabe as Ned Stark
 

Inspired by (x)

(via themarysue)

sexpansion:

Unknown Artist - Ikea Monkey (2012) X Arctic Monkeys - R U Mine (2012)

sexpansion:

Unknown Artist - Ikea Monkey (2012) X Arctic Monkeys - R U Mine (2012)

(via rachmaninoffs)

susiethemoderator:

jonsnowflakes:

Collegehumors’ new video is on point as always

It’s even funnier when you see the White Tears in the comment section saying EXACTLY what the actors say in the video.

(via bedabug)

micdotcom:

6 reasons America must stop ignoring its Black youth

The protests in Ferguson have shown the world that the voices of black youth won’t be silenced. Rather than ignoring their much-needed contributions to important dialogues, it’s time America woke up and actually listened.

Read the full list | Follow micdotcom

(via itscauseyoureafuckinelf)

guardian:

After Michael Brown’s shooting in Ferguson, the opinion departments of Guardian US and the St Louis Post-Dispatch partnered to gather readers’ stories from around the world of being racially profiled by police. Our hope is that this sampling will help spur empathy – and then action, everywhere. 

You can read all 18 stories at Comment is free. Do you have an experience to share? Tell us using the #FergusonVoices hashtag. 

torisora:

happy kamala launch day! go meet this lovely lady, shes wonderful!  :3

torisora:

happy kamala launch day! go meet this lovely lady, shes wonderful!  :3

(via americachavez)